Share

Make This: Easy! 5 Steps To Making This Delicious Japanese Soymilk Jelly With Strawberry

By Dawn Wong | 03 January, 2019 | Food, Kitchen Hacks, Recipe, Uncategorized
2019-01-03 17:30:07 2019-01-03 17:30:11

With the guilt over the past New Year revelry and Christmas feasting weighing heavily upon our minds like a rapacious and overweight sumo wrestler, the idea of  “clean eating” sounds about right. At least right enough to absolve us of all gluttonous guilt temporarily

Despite the certain knowledge that any New Year resolutions to eat healthy in 2019 would soon be abandoned and sink faster than the Titanic did come sometime about March, it is with a dogged determination that we at SALT magazine have decided we should at least start January 2019 right. That’s correct. We are not ambitious. Just one month at a time. Baby steps.

In commemoration of a healthier 2019 and before our self control fails us, this January, we present weekly recipes from Danny Chu’s book,  ‘Living Shojin Ryori’. 

Translated as ‘the food of devotion’, Shojin Ryori is a traditional vegetarian cuisine, where Buddhist monks incorporate the processes of Shojin cooking in their daily practices to achieve a mental state of peace and tranquility. Bottom line is, even if this simple dish doesn’t make you feel any more zen or help you squeeze into that XS Hervé Léger bodycon dress, at least it does taste pretty darn good. 

Soymilk Jelly With Strawberry

Ingredients:

3g Kanten powder

 300 ml Soymilk (unsweetened)

 6 Strawberries

Method:

Mix kanten powder with 5 tsp soymilk to form a paste.

Heat rest of soymilk in a saucepan over low heat. Stir in the kanten mixture. Bring to a boil and immediately remove from heat. Set aside to cool for 10 minutes.

 Pluck out the green tops from every strawberry and remove any green or white part. Cut the strawberry into halves lengthwise and arrange them neatly in a 17.5 X 8 X 6 cm metal tray.

Gently pour in the soymilk mixture. Refrigerate for about 1 hour or until the jelly is set.

Cut the soymilk jelly into blocks and arrange on 4 individual plates to serve. 

Recipe credit: 

‘Living Shojin Ryori’ by Danny Chu, published by Marshall Cavendish, available for sale at all leading book and web stores.

 

 

Her talents/skills sets include having a bottomless pit of a stomach and doing an impressive Chinese split, attributes that will certainly make her highly sought after among employers. (Or so she hopes) She promises not to bite… unless you are a juicy piece of pork lard.